‘Time’ bandit

Avid readers keeping up with the current paranormal-fantasy scene will recognize Sherrilyn Kenyon’s name. With 60 published books across multiple series — and more than 50 of those titles landing on the New York Times best-seller list — the popularity of her work is undeniable.

But Kenyon is not one to rest on her laurels, and her next novel is comes out tomorrow.  Part of her Dark-Hunter series, Time Untime tells the story of an ancient struggle between good and evil, and a young woman caught in the middle. A thousands-year-old prophecy foretells of the destruction the world, but the one man with the power to keep it from coming true may find the price too high to pay.

To celebrate the release of Time Untime, Kenyon will visit Oklahoma City on Wednesday to sign books and meet fans. But the new work isn’t just for longtime readers; to keep the series from growing stagnant, the author uses different casts of characters and new material in every book.

“My desire was to keep the journey engaging, whether it was your first trip or your millionth,” said Kenyon. “That being said, the books don’t have to be read in order. Each one is written so that new readers won’t be lost or confused if they haven’t read a previous book.”

Kenyon describes her style of writing as quirky and sarcastic, even facetious at times. The series as a whole has a dark tone — the titular Hunters are a once-human vampiric race called “daimons,” who must kill to sustain their existence — but also have humor intermingled with seriousness.

“At the end of the day, the books are about people and relationships, and overcoming whatever bad hand you’re dealt,” she said. “They’re about self-discovery and being misjudged by the world and others, and learning to laugh and raise your fist in the midst of the hurricane, and dare the fates to come get you.”

Kenyon speaks with firsthand experience about many of the themes embodied in her books. Before she was an award-winning novelist, she was a girl writing as a means of escape from a turbulent life. Later, Kenyon was homeless for a time, but she never stopped writing, and her stories carried her through.

Now, part of her mission is to give back to others the same gift she was given. That, said Kenyon, is one of the reasons she loves meeting her fans. She hopes to inspire them the same way she was by the storytellers of her childhood; in turn, her fans inspire her to keep writing.

“The biggest bonus is meeting the readers … [who] love my fictional family as much as I do. It’s so humbling to hear and read those stories from my fans,” she said. “If I can give one person a smile on a bad day, then that’s really all I seek.”

Sarah Lobban

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