An outrageous prosecution

I wonder how much money the Indians pay the federal government for
protection services. I don’t know the answer to that, but I do know that
the prosecution of Teddy Mitchell is the biggest protection scheme of
our time. And who better to protect the Indian casino monopoly, but the
federal government?

Teddy
Mitchell, his two sons and several others are charged in an 81-count
indictment in federal court for the Western District of Oklahoma for
operating an illegal gambling business from Mitchell’s home, conducting
high-stakes poker games, and other associated gambling charges.
Apparently, American Indian casinos didn’t like the competition.

Do
you really think Mitchell is the only person in Oklahoma who hosts
poker games or bets on sporting events? What’s the second-best thing
about the Super Bowl, besides watching the commercials? It’s getting
involved and
betting in the office pool, making a friendly wager with your buddies or
spouse, or — if you have the money — maybe giving it to people in Las
Vegas.

How
many of us have bet on college football games and the “March Madness”
classic? The gambling laws in this state and nation are archaic,
outdated and, as we see with Mitchell, used for protection by the
governmental Mafia.

I’ve
been involved in defending gambling cases before. As a matter of fact, I
was involved not that long ago in a gambling case involving the Grady
County sheriff. The same argument made then can now be made with
Mitchell; this is selective prosecution, pure and simple. If the
gambling laws were actually enforced in full, there would be very few of
us not in jail right now.

Any
time I see or defend a gambling case, I look for who can profit
financially or politically, and that’s how I find the reason for the
prosecution. It’s not about punishing crime, but about gain. That is why
the prosecution of Mitchell goes against the very foundation of this
country. It is using the legal system for financial and political gain,
for the protection of the Indians and their casinos.

For
Mitchell not to be able to talk to his sons is an absolute travesty.
Magistrate Judge Shon T. Erwin says letting Mitchell out to home
detention pending trial was a “close one.”

It’s
not close at all. This case should be dismissed, and the U.S. Attorney
sanctioned, and then fired, for improper use of office. Or shut down all
the gambling in this state, including the horse races and Indian
casinos.

While it’s
unlikely that the courts will go against the government, hopefully
common sense in this case will prevail, and the jury will decide on
nullification and acquit Mitchell.

Finally,
what about the true victim in this sad story: Teddy Mitchell’s wife?
She was murdered, but it’s been reduced to a side story to the gambling
prosecution. Does anybody else think this is backwards? Why not use
taxpayer money to find the murderer instead of prosecuting a bookie?

None of this makes sense until you realize who the bag man is and what is being protected.

Homsey is an Oklahoma City attorney.

Opinions expressed on
the commentary page, in letters to the editor and elsewhere in this
newspaper are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the
opinions of ownership or management.

Michael J. "Mickey" Homsey

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