Full ‘Circles’

Americana artist Greg Reichel describes his music as “very real and soulful.” And while many singer-songwriters typically use such terms to describe their sound, Reichel believes he goes out of his way to prove it.

“I try to write with as much soul as I can, instead of just throwing a song together,” he said. “I approach a song — I take just about any kind of situation, something that has happened to me, or somebody else — and I try to make it very meaningful.”

With influences ranging from Todd Snider and Steve Earle to Ryan Adams and Townes Van Zandt, Reichel wants to create music that “tells stories” to which anyone can relate.

“Music is not only a getaway for myself, but for those who come out to see it,” he said. “I have a song called ‘My Morning Coffee,’ and I wrote it about my morning cup of coffee. When someone hears it, I want them to say, ‘Man, this is my morning cup of coffee. This is why I get up and went to work in the morning to put food on the table.’”

Born and raised in Blanchard — and currently living “outside of Dallas” — Reichel recently has poured every ounce of his soul into his latest release, Circles. In support of the album, he’ll perform Sunday at Grady’s 66 Pub as part of the Yukon venue’s Sunday-night Red Dirt Revival series.

Never passing up a chance to play around these parts, Reichel credited his Okie upbringing as influencing his music, as much now as then, especially when it comes to his outlook on the business.

“My family’s been involved in music for years, and it brought me to a higher knowledge of music than what other kids my age might have had,” he said. “By the time I actually got to Texas, I was already pretty aware of what Texas had to offer, as far as the music goes.”

This “higher knowledge” also helped him understand the differences between the music scenes on both sides of the Red River.

“We both have the same sounds in music, but the market in Texas is much larger, just because there’s so many more people,” Reichel said. “It’s not that Texas is better than Oklahoma, because I truly don’t believe that. It’s just that there’s just so much more music floating around.”

This overflow keeps him returning to Oklahoma, and more specifically, places like Grady’s.

“Oklahoma has less venues, but more people wanting to hear music. Texas has a lot more venues, but it’s hard to get a crowd going,” he said. “There’s 20 other guys on the exact same street doing what you are that night. People actually listen when I play here in Oklahoma. It’s really what inspires me to keep doing what I’m doing.”

Louis Fowler

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