Spacial Recognition combines photography and ceramics

Caroline Cohenour (Provided)

Caroline Cohenour (Provided)

Spacial Recognition
6-10 p.m. Friday
Through Aug. 30
In Your Eye Studio & Gallery
3005-A Paseo St.
inyoureyegallery.com
525-2161
Free

So many art shows these days are more art events, which are a great time but take away from the classic simplicity of what an exhibit is all about: the art.

Spacial Recognition, the new exhibit at In Your Eye Studio & Gallery that opens Friday, keeps its focus on the art without all the bells and whistles. But it still provides a unique experience, pairing photographer Caroline Cohenour and ceramic artist Jean Keil. Those two mediums are rarely mixed, and the way each artist’s work complements the other is quite unique, as is the concept.

“We often find that pairing a two-dimensional and three-dimensional artist together works well, but that’s even more the case with these two artists,” said In Your Eye owner Janice Mathews-Gordon. “Their distinctive abstract styles, both emphasizing notions of space but in two completely different mediums, really complement each other and pack a visual punch.”

Cohenour’s photographs are stories, not just shots, and the stories she tells through her camera are stellar, with a style of their own.

“My style right now is easiest to describe as a mindful geometric carnival,” Cohenour said. “I am drawn to energetic color and explosive shapes and energy, but I also like to decode the moment down to something manageable or decipherable to me. It’s kind of like harnessing a wild horse. But I guess that’s all art, really.”

After living in and working in both San Francisco and Los Angeles for the past 15 years, the Oklahoma native is happy to be home. This will be her first exhibit back in Oklahoma City, and her energy is contagious.

“Big cities offer abundant opportunity — and I will forever love those two towns — but coming home to the source offers a more immediate connection,” she said.

Oklahoma is often a source of inspiration for local artists, and Jean Keil, who was raised on a farm in the western part of the state, is no exception.

“It goes back to growing up around all that red dirt,” Keil said. “I tend to put red iron oxide on everything because it accentuates the surface textures.”

Spacial Recognition will explore inside and outside spaces — the complex lens through which we each view the world — and pull it all together in an exciting way. Visitors can expect to see a strong exhibit emphasizing the beauty of simple shapes.

Mathews-Gordon creates a picture of her own when talking about what people can expect from the exhibit.

“I think visitors will leave the exhibit with a sense that they’ve seen something different — eye-opening and strong in its simplicity, with powerful visual appeal,” she said. “I think they’ll also see everyday objects and settings in a new light and reconsider the nature of our public and personal spaces.”

David Dean

This article was written by an Oklahoma Gazette contributor. To reach an editor, please email jchancellor@okgazette.com with this story's headline in your subject line.

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