Oklahoma Humanities Council is now accepting grant applications

The Fabergé egg exhibit was brought to OKCMOA with the help of a grant from Oklahoma Humanities Council. (Provided)

The Fabergé egg exhibit was brought to OKCMOA with the help of a grant from Oklahoma Humanities Council. (Provided)

Nonprofits have a new set of opportunities for funding this fall as Oklahoma Humanities Council (OHC) begins taking new applications for grants.

“Eligible projects must support the OHC mission to strengthen communities by helping Oklahomans learn about the human experience, understand new perspectives and participate knowledgeably in civic life,” according to OHC.

Major grants can be awarded up to $8,500, and challenge grants can go as high as $15,000.

The major difference between the two types of grants is that the challenge grant matches dollar for dollar what the nonprofit raises up to $15,000, OHC Program Officer Caroline Lowrey said. Once the applicant is notified that they have the grant, they have 90 days to raise up to $15,000.

However, she emphasized that the grantee does not have to raise the full $15,000 to get the matching funds. If an organization raises $1,000, then OHC will grant $1,000.

Lowrey said that one recent example of a successful challenge grant given was for the Fabergé jewelry exhibit at Oklahoma City Museum of Art (OKCMOA).

“They had 90 days to raise $15,000, and they did it. We then matched that,” Lowrey said.

The exhibit will be at OKCMOA until Sept. 27.

The major grants are for organizations that do not want to try to raise their own funds in addition to funds from OHC. Those grants are capped at a smaller amount and generally involve a particular event like a one-time lecture or performance.

Oklahoma Hall of Fame received a major grant in the spring and will have author and voice talent Michael Wallis for a lecture in conjunction with the America’s Road: The Journey of Route 66 exhibit on July 30 at 6 p.m.

Projects that qualify for the grants can include discussion programs, lectures, panel discussions, websites, audio or video productions and exhibitions. There is a broad spectrum of possibilities for nonprofits in Oklahoma with these grants.

The grants are meant to promote deeper thinking and appreciation for the arts and cultures of all kinds in Oklahoma through other nonprofit organizations.

“The arts are the what, and the humanities are the why,” Lowrey said.

As program officer, she helps applicants by coaching them on the application process, even down to functional things about navigating the digital application online.

“I have helped people upload their application to the website before,” Lowrey said. “If anyone needs help, I am here to help. Please call me, call me, call me.”

OHC is the Oklahoma partner of the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) and receives regular funding from that national organization.

NEH has similar partner organizations in each state and territory of the U.S.

Those partners pass money to each state partner so they can grant the money to nonprofits in their state.

Aug. 1 is the deadline for application drafts for both major and challenge grants. Aug. 15 is the final deadline for applications. Applicants need to plan to wait 90 days from the final application before the proposed event or project beings.

Interested nonprofits in Oklahoma may learn more about the process of applying by going to okhumanities.org, or they may contact Lowrey by phone at 235-0280 or by email at caroline@okhumanities.org.

Print headline: Grant land, Oklahoma Humanities Council is accepting the next round of applications for grants.

Brett Dickerson

This article was written by an Oklahoma Gazette contributor. To reach an editor, please email jchancellor@okgazette.com with this story's headline in your subject line.

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