Jewels for the Journey gears up independent artists for navigating the music industry

Randy Chekow <em>left</em> and Jason Feehan co-wrote <em>The Indie Survival Guide</em> and <em>The DIY Music Manual</em>. They both speak at Jewels for the Journey. (provided)

Randy Chekow left and Jason Feehan co-wrote The Indie Survival Guide and The DIY Music Manual. They both speak at Jewels for the Journey. (provided)

The internet age has been a golden era for independent music artists, but for those willing to venture out into the music business without backing from a major record label, it’s important to come equipped with the knowledge for success.

Jewels for the Journey Oklahoma State Music Conference hopes to impart the gems of knowledge needed for a successful career to independent musicians and music managers.

The music business workshop and conference is 8:30 a.m.-6 p.m. March 18 at Metro Technology Centers’ Business Conference Center, 1900 Springlake Drive. Registration is now open at eventbrite.com for $100.

The price is a true bargain compared to other events of this size, many of which are held in large metropolitan areas within non-neighboring states.

Attorney Ben McLane — whose clients have included Allstar Weekend, Anita Baker, Digital Underground, DMX, LL Cool J, The Beach Boys’ Al Jardine and many more — is one of Jewels for the Journey’s scheduled speakers. The event also includes Randy Chertkow and Jason Feehan, bandmates in Chicago’s pop-rock Beatnik Turtle and co-authors of The Indie Band Survival Guide and The DIY Music Manual, and DJ Detroit of Core DJs speaking on how to approach DJs about getting music played.

The conference was created by One Ace Entertainment, a local company dedicated to helping independent artists find avenues for building their careers. Tiffany Williams, One Ace’s founder and CEO, is known locally as semi-retired rapper Lady Ace, once briefly signed to Columbia Records. Williams can also be heard as a host on KSVP Power 103.5.

Williams said her own experience in the music industry inspires her to help other artists learn how to make their craft profitable. She did not know anything about the business side of music during her time with a major label, blindly relying on her management to take care of those matters. She said not knowing more about the details in the papers she was signing was her biggest mistake as an artist.

“All I knew was to get in the booth and record,” she said. “I went on tour and enjoyed myself, but afterward, there’s some things I wish I had stepped out of the booth and learned for myself instead of depending on management and other people.”

The internet has given artists a platform to market themselves in a way that was not possible when Williams’ music career was at its peak. But with enhanced power to pursue music independently comes an even greater need for individual business savvy.

“I know you can go to ‘YouTube University’ every day or Google,” Williams said, “but the conference is intended to give face-to-face value.”

Those serious about making money in music, she said, should invest in themselves by furthering their knowledge. Anything is possible with the right tools and connections.

“There’s money out here for everyone, and if [something] is your passion, no matter what it is that you do, you go to school to learn,” she said. “It’s like going back to school for the business.”

Visit oneaceent.com.


Jewels for the Journey

8:30 a.m.-6 p.m. March 18

Business Conference Center

Metro Technology Center

1900 Springlake Drive

oneaceent.com

450-777-6977

$100


Print headline: Precious tools, Jewels for the Journey prepares independent artists to navigate the music industry.

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