Friday 25 Jul
 
 

Planting the seed

Chelsey Cope’s new band, Elms, is as earthy and native to Oklahoma as the trees that are their namesake. The soulful folk four-piece’s debut EP, Parallel Lines, was recorded at Bell Labs Recording Studio in Norman and is on its way in September. But the band has already given us a tease, with its first single, “Burn,” going live on SoundCloud on July 14.
07/22/2014 | Comments 0

Commercial rock

Center of the Universe Festival featuring Capital Cities, Young The Giant, AWOLNATION & more
Friday-Saturday
Downtown Tulsa 
centeroftheuniversefestival.com 
$35-$50 

07/22/2014 | Comments 0

Mack truckin’

Swizzymack
9 p.m. Friday 
Kamp’s Lounge 
1310 NW 25th St. 
lndrnrs.com 
819-6004 
$10-$15 

07/23/2014 | Comments 0

Chevy cruisin’

Chevy Woods with Kevin Gates & more
9 p.m. Sunday 
Vibe Night Club 
227 SW 25th St. 
$20-$40 

07/16/2014 | Comments 0

Rock steady

Tesla
7 p.m. Saturday
Frontier City
11501 N. Interstate 35 Service Road 
frontiercity.com
478-2140
Free with park admission 

07/16/2014 | Comments 0
Home · Articles · Reviews · Folk · Bob Dylan — In Concert:...
Folk
 

Bob Dylan — In Concert: Brandeis University


A must-have for Dylan collectors

Rob Collins March 28th, 2011

A year before The Beatles exploded on “The Ed Sullivan Show,” Bob Dylan planned to perform “Talkin’ John Birch Paranoid Blues” in the spring of 1963 for a national TV audience.

bobdylaninconcert

But when a CBS executive feared a libel suit from the John Birch Society and asked Bob to perform something else, Dylan walked out.

American audiences never saw Dylan’s satirical song performed on the popular Sunday-night variety show on May 12, 1963. However, a previously unknown recording of that song from two days before is the centerpiece of “In Concert: Brandeis University.” The source recording, a seven-inch reel, was recently discovered of the concert that occurred two weeks prior to the release of “The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan” studio album.

The paranoid talking blues censored from both the CBS show and the “Freewheelin’” album told of communist “reds” and ends with the song’s narrator investigating himself: “Well, I quit my job so I could work all alone, and I changed my name to Sherlock Holmes / Following some clues from my detective bag, I discovered there were red stripes in the American flag.”

The release is a must-have for Dylan collectors. The intimate recording documents a 21-year-old Dylan in full protest-song mode, methodically strumming his acoustic guitar and singing in a gruffly deviant voice on “Masters of War” and “Ballad of Hollis Brown.” Listeners are transported back in time to the Cold War when John F. Kennedy was president. —Rob Collins

 
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