Wednesday 23 Apr
 
 

Norman rock well

Norman Music Festival

6 p.m.-2 a.m. Thursday, 3:30 p.m.-2 a.m. Friday and noon-2 a.m. Saturday

Downtown Norman

normanmusicfestival.com

Free

04/23/2014 | Comments 0

Grouplovin’ it

Grouplove with MS MR and Smallpools

6:30 p.m. Monday

Diamond Ballroom

8001 S. Eastern Ave.

diamondballroom.net

677-9169

$22-$24

04/23/2014 | Comments 0

Hear and now

Hear the Music Tour with The Warren Brothers and Lance Miller

6-10 p.m. Friday

Rodeo Opry

2221 Exchange Ave.

songsforsound.com

$35-$50

04/22/2014 | Comments 0

Odyssey of the mind

Jacob Fred Jazz Odyssey 

with Culture Cinematic and ADDverse Effects

9 p.m. Friday

Twisted Root Gallery

3012 N. Walker Ave.

twistedrootgallery.com

208-4288

$10

04/16/2014 | Comments 0

Frndz with benefits

Boyfrndz with Bored Wax and The Hitt Boyz

9 p.m. Sunday

Blue Note Lounge

2408 N. Robinson Ave.

thebluenotelounge.com

600-1166

$5

04/16/2014 | Comments 0
Home · Articles · CDs · Folk · Bob Dylan — In Concert: Brandeis...
Folk
 

Bob Dylan — In Concert: Brandeis University


A must-have for Dylan collectors

Rob Collins March 28th, 2011

A year before The Beatles exploded on “The Ed Sullivan Show,” Bob Dylan planned to perform “Talkin’ John Birch Paranoid Blues” in the spring of 1963 for a national TV audience.

bobdylaninconcert

But when a CBS executive feared a libel suit from the John Birch Society and asked Bob to perform something else, Dylan walked out.

American audiences never saw Dylan’s satirical song performed on the popular Sunday-night variety show on May 12, 1963. However, a previously unknown recording of that song from two days before is the centerpiece of “In Concert: Brandeis University.” The source recording, a seven-inch reel, was recently discovered of the concert that occurred two weeks prior to the release of “The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan” studio album.

The paranoid talking blues censored from both the CBS show and the “Freewheelin’” album told of communist “reds” and ends with the song’s narrator investigating himself: “Well, I quit my job so I could work all alone, and I changed my name to Sherlock Holmes / Following some clues from my detective bag, I discovered there were red stripes in the American flag.”

The release is a must-have for Dylan collectors. The intimate recording documents a 21-year-old Dylan in full protest-song mode, methodically strumming his acoustic guitar and singing in a gruffly deviant voice on “Masters of War” and “Ballad of Hollis Brown.” Listeners are transported back in time to the Cold War when John F. Kennedy was president. —Rob Collins

 
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