Friday 11 Jul
 
 

Next big thing

As far as songs go, few prove as challenging to sing as our national anthem.

It’s a technically demanding tune from first note to last, to be sure, beginning with a low bellow that quickly soars toward star-punching high notes, eventually swelling to a show-stopping crescendo that even the most seasoned performer can have trouble mastering.

07/09/2014 | Comments 0

Sheriff Woody

Woody Guthrie Folk Festival featuring Jimmy LaFave, Arlo Guthrie and more

Wednesday through Sunday

Okemah

woodyguthrie.com

Free

07/09/2014 | Comments 0

California dreamin’

Modern Pantheist with The Wurly Birds and Larry Chin

9 p.m. Sunday

Blue Note Lounge 

2408 N. Robinson Ave.

thebluenotelounge.com

600-1166

$5

07/02/2014 | Comments 0

Major League tunes

Chipper Jones with The Hitt Boyz, Foxburrows and Milk Jr

8 p.m. Saturday

VZD’s Restaurant & Club

4200 N. Western Ave.

vzds.com

524-4200

07/02/2014 | Comments 0

Neon colors

Utah-based rockers Neon Trees spent a hot summer night setting fire to Tulsa’s legendary Cain’s Ballroom on June 19. Rounding out the aural palette were Smallpools, a lively L.A. powerhouse, and Nightmare and the Cat, a cadre of black-clad Brit/American alt-rockers. Neon Trees’ latest record, Pop Psychology, was the night’s flux capacitor, transporting all who were willing to a neon-soaked parallel universe.
06/25/2014 | Comments 0
Home · Articles · Reviews · Folk · Jackie-O Motherf***er — Earth...
Folk
 

Jackie-O Motherf***er — Earth Sound System


Earth to Jackie-O: Do you read me? No? OK, then.

Matt Carney August 5th, 2011

Naming your band Jackie-O Motherfucker is the titling equivalent of purchasing a license to record whatever the hell music you want, as far as I and the Americana-experimentin’ Portland indie collective are concerned.

jackieomotherfuckerearthsoundsystem

They’re kindred spirits to Waka Flocka Flame in that sense. And that sense only.

But enough teasing about Jackie-O’s name. Let’s tease them for recording a patience-trying album.

Earth Sound System” contains a pair of tracks — one exactly seven minutes and eight seconds in length, and one sitting right at nine and a half — that might not even be music. They’re titled “Raga Joining” and “Raga Separating,” respectively, and are both experimental droners that don’t sound anything like … well, anything, really. They sound like what your typical layperson probably thought the inside of computers sounded like in 1987: lots of offbeat clicks and whirrs, and percussion instruments that bands often think are really funny.

The album marks a pretty stark difference from 1995 when the collective — it’s hard to call them a band when they’ve had more than 40 members over the years, only one of them constant — started out as a freeform jazz outfit. Their sound’s pretty clearly evolved into a rustic, psych-folk-type thing. Lots of finger-picking on the guitar that nicely comfits around Tom Greenwood’s dreary singing, which is basically an earthier, less-British take on Jason Pierce of Spiritualized. It’s lovely and comforting, like a big, sloppy St. Bernard licking at your face.

With this formula, “In the Willows” and “Dedication” both redeem the album’s title, but not “Earth Sound System” as a whole. It’s too spaced-out to be saved. —Matt Carney

 
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