Tuesday 22 Jul
 
 

Chevy cruisin’

Chevy Woods with Kevin Gates & more
9 p.m. Sunday 
Vibe Night Club 
227 SW 25th St. 
$20-$40 

07/16/2014 | Comments 0

Rock steady

Tesla
7 p.m. Saturday
Frontier City
11501 N. Interstate 35 Service Road 
frontiercity.com
478-2140
Free with park admission 

07/16/2014 | Comments 0

Narrative verse

L.T.Z. with Jabee, Frank Black & more
8 p.m. Saturday
The Conservatory 
8911 N. Western Ave. 
conservatoryokc.com 
607-4805
$7 

07/16/2014 | Comments 0

Dancing in the Twilight

Sunday Twilight Concert Series with The Wurly Birds
7:30 p.m. Sunday
Myriad Botanical Gardens 
301 W. Reno Ave. 
myriadgardens.org 
445-7080
Free 

07/16/2014 | Comments 0

Next big thing

As far as songs go, few prove as challenging to sing as our national anthem.

It’s a technically demanding tune from first note to last, to be sure, beginning with a low bellow that quickly soars toward star-punching high notes, eventually swelling to a show-stopping crescendo that even the most seasoned performer can have trouble mastering.

07/09/2014 | Comments 0
Home · Articles · Reviews · Eclectic · Good King Friday — Good...
Eclectic
 

Good King Friday — Good King Friday


Matt Carney December 28th, 2011

The University of Oklahoma music department proved to be the intersection of a stellar symphonic-pop record.

Good King Friday is the product of a collaboration between OU music professor Christina Giacona, some childhood friends in Los Angeles, former OU students Patrick Conlon and Audrey Snyder (hailing from Canada and Chicago, respectively) and lyricist Matt Kolbet, the brother-in-law of bassist Nathan Caswell.

It’s remarkable that an album by such a far-spread ensemble got recorded at all, let alone one of such spectacular progressive classical breadth as “Good King Friday” spans.

Standout tracks like “Breakdown” chug along at an up-tempo pace before arching impossibly high on an echoing, jagged violin solo, propelled by Chris Wakelin’s hard-charging drums. The song eventually comes to a close with scattered cymbals, each instrument pulling away until just the cello’s left. It’s an example of the masterfully subtle construction found on each track.

Clarinets suggest pastoral beauty in “Carousel”; “The Hours” and “Burning Down” waltz along at a calmer pace, and “Who Knows if the Moon’s Not a Balloon” takes a dramatic turn from childish whimsy.

Ditch the classical-influenced rock of Trans-Siberian Orchestra and go for the good men and women of Good King Friday — they’ve got the real thing. —Matt Carney

 
  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
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