Monday 28 Jul
 
 

Planting the seed

Chelsey Cope’s new band, Elms, is as earthy and native to Oklahoma as the trees that are their namesake. The soulful folk four-piece’s debut EP, Parallel Lines, was recorded at Bell Labs Recording Studio in Norman and is on its way in September. But the band has already given us a tease, with its first single, “Burn,” going live on SoundCloud on July 14.
07/22/2014 | Comments 0

Commercial rock

Center of the Universe Festival featuring Capital Cities, Young The Giant, AWOLNATION & more
Friday-Saturday
Downtown Tulsa 
centeroftheuniversefestival.com 
$35-$50 

07/22/2014 | Comments 0

Mack truckin’

Swizzymack
9 p.m. Friday 
Kamp’s Lounge 
1310 NW 25th St. 
lndrnrs.com 
819-6004 
$10-$15 

07/23/2014 | Comments 0

Chevy cruisin’

Chevy Woods with Kevin Gates & more
9 p.m. Sunday 
Vibe Night Club 
227 SW 25th St. 
$20-$40 

07/16/2014 | Comments 0

Rock steady

Tesla
7 p.m. Saturday
Frontier City
11501 N. Interstate 35 Service Road 
frontiercity.com
478-2140
Free with park admission 

07/16/2014 | Comments 0
Home · Articles · Reviews · Pop · Code 22 — Going Soft: The...
Pop
 

Code 22 — Going Soft: The Acoustic Album!


Louis Fowler May 8th, 2013

The guys of Oklahoma City’s Code 22 seem like a likable group of fellas. Their latest release, Going Soft: The Acoustic Album!, is likable enough as well — so likable that on first listen, I took its clean, acoustic sound and clear, unstressed vocals as an alternative praise-and-worship band.

But after listening to the third track, “Nerdgasm,” I realized they’re not a Christian band at all — just four goofy, kinda nerdy, likable dudes. And we do need those in the world, including for romantic montages on flashback episodes of The Big Bang Theory.

With the lyrics “I get to fight the girl of my dreams and her name’s Chun Li,” the aforementioned “Nerdgasm” is one of the few songs that isn’t a Weezer-like pop ditty about love, whether unrequited, rejected or long-lost.

In “Pining Over You,” the guys are “brokenhearted ever since we parted,” while in “Too Late,” they’re waiting for a girl to get over a guy she just can’t get over.

Even likable guys have their limits, as the final track, “I Don’t Really Miss You,” gets assertive, or at least admirably tries. But they can’t stay mad at you, girl. Then they wouldn’t be likable anymore. —Louis Fowler


 
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