Tuesday 22 Jul
 
 

Chevy cruisin’

Chevy Woods with Kevin Gates & more
9 p.m. Sunday 
Vibe Night Club 
227 SW 25th St. 
$20-$40 

07/16/2014 | Comments 0

Rock steady

Tesla
7 p.m. Saturday
Frontier City
11501 N. Interstate 35 Service Road 
frontiercity.com
478-2140
Free with park admission 

07/16/2014 | Comments 0

Narrative verse

L.T.Z. with Jabee, Frank Black & more
8 p.m. Saturday
The Conservatory 
8911 N. Western Ave. 
conservatoryokc.com 
607-4805
$7 

07/16/2014 | Comments 0

Dancing in the Twilight

Sunday Twilight Concert Series with The Wurly Birds
7:30 p.m. Sunday
Myriad Botanical Gardens 
301 W. Reno Ave. 
myriadgardens.org 
445-7080
Free 

07/16/2014 | Comments 0

Next big thing

As far as songs go, few prove as challenging to sing as our national anthem.

It’s a technically demanding tune from first note to last, to be sure, beginning with a low bellow that quickly soars toward star-punching high notes, eventually swelling to a show-stopping crescendo that even the most seasoned performer can have trouble mastering.

07/09/2014 | Comments 0
Home · Articles · Reviews · Folk · Honeylark — Heavy
Folk
 

Honeylark — Heavy


Louis Fowler January 7th, 2014

The Oklahoma City music scene has been abuzz about Honeylark the past couple of weeks. Once you listen to their latest release, Heavy, you realize the hype is deadly justifiable.

The Americana outfit, led by Natalie Moore Houck and Ryan Houck, captures that unique Oklahoma Red Dirt sound, but in this case, the red is ominously stained crimson and the dirt is ready to be thrown on top of a coffin. This is the soundtrack of Okie-noir pulps and backwoods eulogies, left-for-dead lovers and dying dreamers.

The album openers “Widow” and especially “Love is Red” set the tone of things to come as the listener looks down and starts to see the aural blood on their hands. The speakeasy jazz of “Afternoon” is a smoking gun, but “Alas” is the upbeat, poppy bullet aimed right for the heart of those who’ve been “feeling sorry” for themselves. True crime meets true love for a truly original soundscape.

But even after you’re long dead and buried, the mystery continues as Natalie’s sultry, smoky vocals seduce the freshly deceased like a siren on the river Styx. “Cold and still is the lake tonight,” she coos on the Lee Hazlewood-esque “Bones,” and you sure as hell better believe it and be ready to follow her into the underworld.

It’s fitting that the best track on the album is “Hospital,” with the lullaby-like saunter of “tell me where it hurts” calmly delivering the listener into Death’s cold but welcoming arms. Good thing he has great taste in music. — Louis Fowler

 
  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
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