Saturday 19 Apr
 
 
CD reviews

Dustin Prinz - Eleven

Few musicians take the time to master their instrument in the way that Oklahoma City singer-songwriter Dustin Prinz has; he’s a guitar virtuoso in every sense of the word, and Eleven gives him the chance to show just how far he can push that skill.
04/15/2014 | Comments 0

Horse Thief – Fear in Bliss

Listening to Horse Thief’s previous release — the haphazardly melodramatic Grow Deep, Grow Wild — felt like a chore. Whatever potential the Oklahoma City folk-pop act demonstrated on the EP was obscured behind a formulaic, contrived and ultimately hollow cloud. But it at least offered a glimmer of promise for a band consisting of, frankly, five pretty talented dudes. Critics saw it; the band’s management saw it; its current label, Bella Union, saw it; and its increasingly fervid fan base saw it.
04/08/2014 | Comments 0

Colourmusic — May You Marry Rich

There’s always a sense of danger when debuting songs in a live setting and playing them well. Without having heard the studio versions, expectations are set according to the live incarnations. But capturing the breadth of free-flowing atmosphere and sheer volume on a disc, vinyl or digital file isn’t the easiest thing to do, especially for a band as vociferous as Colourmusic.
04/01/2014 | Comments 0

Em and the MotherSuperiors — Churches into Theaters

As titles go, Churches into Theaters is an apt descriptor for the debut album from Oklahoma City rockers Em and the MotherSuperiors. It’s a reverential record, one that shares the gospel of classic rock, blues and soul but embraces the need to refashion it for modern times, channeling The Dead Weather, Grace Potter and Cage the Elephant along the way.
03/25/2014 | Comments 0

Rachel Brashear — Revolution

Rachel Brashear’s second EP, Revolution, starts with a kick to the shins.
03/18/2014 | Comments 0
 

NMF4: Saturday Sirens/Gregg Standridge/Man-made Objects


Rock, country and shoegaze in a row

By Stephen Carradini April 29th, 2011
GreggStandridge

After arriving too early at Blackwatch Stage for Unwed Sailor, I also arrived too early at Opolis for ManMade Objects. Instead, I caught the end of Saturday Sirens' frantic set. They were really pounding on their instruments and voices. It was a pretty impressive ruckus with a lot of movement.

Heading up the street, I stopped in at Bluebonnet Stage and listened to Gregg Standridge's (above, on right) country/folk/Southern rock amalgam. His band was sharp, and the sound was tight as a result. Ranging from outlaw country to ballads to crunchy tunes, the band went through a wide range of sounds. Each was pulled off impressively, not showing any signs of preference or of weakness.

After thoroughly enjoying Standridge's music, I returned to Opolis to actually catch Man-Made Objects (right). Their tunes fell in the space between psych and shoegaze, which made for a woozy, mind-melding experience. The band didn't move around much, but they made up for their lack of motion in dissonant volume. Fans of reverb and My Bloody Valentine should perk up their ears.

 
  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
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