OKGazette.com - Indie http://www.okgazette.com/oklahoma/articles.sec-51-1-indie.html <![CDATA[Manmade Objects - Monuments - ]]> No one wants to be forgotten; everyone wants some sort of legacy, a mark they leave behind as they exit this life for whatever lies beyond.

And for as long as there has been death, there have been monuments — whether austere or understated, abstract or concrete, prominent or tucked away in private — erected by the ones they loved to assure that remembrance, at least for a time.
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<![CDATA[Depth & Current - Dysrhythmia - ]]> "Overproduced" is a term thrown around all too indiscreetly nowadays, usually applied when the thing that sticks out about a song or album is how it sounds rather than how it is constructed. Yet some of the most compelling albums ever crafted embodied a certain aesthetic that was just as skillfully and meticulously put together as any Bob Dylan or Miles Davis record — which is to say production is as crucial to our enjoyment of music as much as anything else; it's also the most overlooked.]]> <![CDATA[The Electric Würms - "Heart of the Sunrise" - ]]> For a band so prolific, ambitious and endearingly experimental, it’s a wonder that more Flaming Lips side projects haven’t emerged over the years. Several dozen collaborations have come and gone, but rarely anything that wasn’t released under the official Lips’ umbrella. It makes sense, given that the Oklahoma natives have never shied away from casting a wide net in its 30-odd years.]]> <![CDATA[Weak Knees - “IceBevo” - ]]> Indie rock has been in a good place as of late. Not caring about being cool is the new cool, and a couple of dudes on guitar, bass and drums can make catchy, earworm songs without being armed to the gills with computer software and vintage synthesizers.]]> <![CDATA[Fiawna Forté - mi-MOH-suh-pud-EE-kuh: A Lo-Fi Album - ]]> When you have a voice as brawny and potent as Fiawna Forté’s, it’s tempting to let loose at every opportunity — let your hair down, unleash your cathartic howl and capitalize on your unusual skill. The Tulsa singer-songwriter’s 2010 debut album, Transitusdid exactly that; guitars were amplified to the max, and its songs were progressive in the sense that they built toward an inevitable release. The record operated largely within this traditional indie-rock framework, to the point where even its quieter moments couldn’t help but boil over.]]> <![CDATA[Idre - Idre - ]]> For a long time there, metal felt like it was on life support, relegated to the dankest of underground clubs and precious few high school loner iPods.]]> <![CDATA[Luna Moth - Celestial Shades - ]]> Luna Moth is no stranger to experimentation. Joey Paz’s Norman-based project began in 2010 with Shamanic Youtha 10-track exploration of layered guitar and pop deconstruction, but has since evolved into a fleshed-out four-piece. And while the ideas implemented have traversed a diverse range of genres, its conceptual foundation largely remains unchanged.]]> <![CDATA[IndianGiver - Understudies - ]]> There’s a difference between being derivative and being inspired by something, a line a lot of artists can’t seem to find — or at least don’t care to.]]> <![CDATA[Horse Thief – Fear in Bliss - ]]> Listening to Horse Thief’s previous release — the haphazardly melodramatic Grow Deep, Grow Wild — felt like a chore. Whatever potential the Oklahoma City folk-pop act demonstrated on the EP was obscured behind a formulaic, contrived and ultimately hollow cloud. But it at least offered a glimmer of promise for a band consisting of, frankly, five pretty talented dudes. Critics saw it; the band’s management saw it; its current label, Bella Union, saw it; and its increasingly fervid fan base saw it.]]> <![CDATA[Oklahoma Cloud Factory — Ancestral Ghosts - ]]>

There’s a cinematic quality to Oklahoma Cloud Factory’s debut album, Ancestral Ghosts, one that indie-bent folk-rock outfits always seem to be grasping at. But thanks to a fun set of sonic idiosyncrasies, OCF lands on a different terrain than that of Band of Horses or Lord Huron.

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<![CDATA[Graham Colton — Lonely Ones - ]]> For some, Graham Colton’s latest album might be a jarring experience, marking a significant creative shift from polite folk-pop to the just-left-of-mainstream alternative rock grounds that have proven so fruitful in recent years for Foster the People, Young the Giant and Grouplove.]]> <![CDATA[Various Artists — A Blackwatch Christmas Vol. III (Holly-Tonk & Jingle Beats) - ]]>
Three volumes in and A Blackwatch Christmas yet again nabs a spot on the nice list, showcasing a smattering of Oklahoma artists with charming new holiday standards. This year shakes up the status quo with two themed halves — serving up dusty, countrified Christmas ditties on the Holly-Tonk side and soulful hip-hop carols with Jingle Beats, both with joyful returns.
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<![CDATA[Colourmusic — A Very Special Colourmusic Christmas: Vol. 1 - ]]>

Oklahoma is quickly becoming the indie Christmas music capital of the world, it seems, with yearly compilation albums featuring everyone from Stardeath and White Dwarfs to Graham Colton. So it makes sense that Colourmusic — freak-poppers hailing from Stillwater — would craft a full album of original, offbeat holiday tunes themselves.

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<![CDATA[The Flaming Lips — Peace Sword - ]]> The Flaming Lips’ longevity has allowed them to cover a lot of sonic terrain over the years. Yet they’ve arguably become more adventurous with age, jeopardizing a good portion of their fan base in favor of fascinatingly bleak experiments in sound, beginning with Embryonic in 2009 and, more recently, The Terror.]]> <![CDATA[Grooms — Infinity Caller - ]]> Grooms may be based out of Brooklyn, but their roots are firmly entrenched in Norman. Frontman Travis Johnson — an OU graduate — is the project’s linchpin, one that underwent a series of lineup shuffles and a name change (from The Muggabears) before relocating.]]> <![CDATA[Tallows — Memory Marrow - ]]> Expectations can be a real pain in the ass. With today’s digital release model, hype trains traverse the Internet at breakneck speeds, often before a proper album is released. One or two great songs can set the bar so extraordinarily high that it will never be attained, much less cleared.]]> <![CDATA[Leaf Hands — Your Imagination - ]]> While listening to the opening track of Leaf Hands’ Your Imagination, it’s almost impossible to not stare at the cover art: a bleak, early-winter rural landscape wherein distant figures huddle together and feel a lo-fi sense of melancholy.]]> <![CDATA[Young Lyons — Crash Course EP - ]]> The first time I heard Weezer was a magical moment. It was early-September 1994 and I was in the parking lot of a Catholic church making out with a girl I had desperately been trying to hook up with for weeks.]]> <![CDATA[Bowlsey — Sleepy Weather - ]]> Bowlsey is a fearless bunch. Not fearless in that robotic, armor-clad superhero kind of way, but fearless because its members have nothing to lose, so why not rap over that muffled synth-pop track? Hell, you could even plant it between a couple soulful acoustic ballads. Sure, that’ll work.]]> <![CDATA[Western Residents — Sunlit Nights - ]]> When describing music, the word "maturity" implies that some weathering has been endured by a band — through trial and error, life events or what have you — before attaining this idea of a true identity, if it ever does. ]]>