Tuesday 29 Jul
 
 
 photo BO-Button1_zps13524083.jpg

 

OKG Newsletter


Topic: soundtrack

Music from 'Another Earth'

Ladies and gentlemen, we are floating in space!

No matter how audiences receive “Another Earth” when the Sundance drama tinged with sci-fi elements opens Friday here in the 405, one thing is certain: Its stellar soundtrack is heavenly.

Eighteen of its 19 tracks are original compositions from new duo Fall on Your Sword, a new project of composer Will Bates and LCD Soundsystem’s Philip Mossman. Here, they’ve crafted an ethereally threaded, warm blanket of trippy, downtempo instrumentals, delivered atop a bed of understated electronics and orchestral instruments. Think a toned-down Tangerine Dream as remixed by Two Lone Swordsmen.

The album opens and closes with variations on its stark, sonic theme, “The First Time I Saw Jupiter,” whose simple melodics and stick percussion result in instant accessibility and addiction. “Rhoda’s Theme” seems beamed from space, accompanied by a ghostly wisp of an angelic voice, while “Making Contact” breaks out of the box to offer some ominous vibes via strings. I don’t know what pep meds “Rhoda’s Theme/Returning to John” are on, but I want some.

The disc is peppered with a number of short, piano-driven bits like “Bob the Robot” and “House Theme,” serving as transitional bridges to the showier numbers. Another track doing the same is Phaedon Papadopoulos “Sonatina in D Minor,” a straightforward piano piece that’s not out of character, given the tone Fall on Your Sword establishes.

If the movie proves even half this good, yum. —Rod Lott

by Rod Lott 08.16.2011 2 years ago
at 12:05 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

Rod loves (at least tangentially related to movies) CDs

You may wanna ‘Drive’ these into your ears.

As a serious pop-culture playa, I do more than consume movies. I’ve also been known to eat up music as well. It’s simply by coincidence that the latest batch of discs to hit my desk are related to film in one way or another, directly or indirectly. Like what, you ask? Like ...

Drive (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack) 

The year’s best movie gives us the year’s best soundtrack, anchored by a damn fine score from Cliff Martinez, whose work I’ve admired since his sparse guitar on “sex, lies, and videotape” in 1989. Here, Martinez proves himself a master of mood, with 14 down-tempo cuts that exist in the shadows but pulse with tension and excitement. His beats are very much a character in the film, but they work well on their own, especially as a soundtrack to your own zooming about town. Where else will such menacing titles (“Skull Crushing,” “They Broke His Pelvis,” “Kick Your Teeth”) belie their come-down content?

I also cannot discount the disc’s first five tracks, mostly synth-driven, ’80s-influenced numbers by under-the-radar acts Kavinsky & Lovefoxxx, Desire, College and Chromatics. The show may be stolen, by Italian composer Riz Ortolani’s “Oh My Love,” a 1971 ballad showcasing the beautiful, seductive voice of Katyna Ranieri, which ironically provides the sonic background to cinema’s grisliest elevator encounter.

Batman: Arkham City - The Album

Soundtracks to video games are no longer a novelty, and “Batman: Arkham City — The Album” is among the most heavily promoted I’ve ever seen. No matter how the game turns out — quite awesome, if its predecessor is any indication — the disc offers 11 tracks of songs (some original) that’s surprisingly cohesive for a “various artists” effort. I’ve no idea if these actually appear in the game, but all would fit (Daughtry excepted), being various shades of dark and grimy. Immediate standouts for me were †††’s “The Years” and Panic! At the Disco’s “Mercenary,” which is the closest thing to joy the compilation dares reach.

A better-than-usual Black Rebel Motorcycle Club recalls Stone Roses on “Shadow on the Run,” while The Raveonettes dish out their brand of gloom-pop with “Oh, Stranger.” While I’m no fan of the over-the-top style of Coheed and Cambria (here with “Deranged”), I admit to digging the over-the-top of vocals of System of the Down’s Serj Tankian, who’s solo here with “Total Paranoia.” Also among the rogue’s gallery of groups: The Duke Spirit, The Damned Things and The Boxer Rebellion. Perhaps its spirit of all things Gotham will tie you over until “The Dark Knight Rises” lands in theaters.

Doug Benson - Potty Mouth

The title holds double meaning, because not only is comedian Doug Benson’s act decidedly R-rated, but the man loves his marijuana. I know this because he won’t stop talking about it in this live act, not to mention in his podcast, “Doug Loves Movies,” which currently is something to live for (and justifies me including his disc here). Culled from two consecutive shows, “Potty Mouth” finds Benson doing his usual stand-up, which isn’t usual in the stand-up world. Rather than follow the standard set-up/punch-line formula, he just seems to talk from the top of his head (he’s well-noted for his lack of being able to remember anything without writing it down).

Thus, we get seemingly random observations on Twitter (including him calling out audience members tweeting about the show during the show, marijuana, dirty words, more marijuana, the Black Eyed Peas, and even more marijuana. A highlight has him telling him the world’s cleanest joke and the world’s dirtiest joke simultaneously, alternating between the two line by line. It makes sense when you hear it, and I hope you do. Bonus: The non-digital, physical-CD version includes a DVD of his now-canceled Comedy Central series, “The Benson Interruption.”

Robert Davi - Davi Sings Sinatra: On the Road to Romance

Yes, folks, that Robert Davi: the character actor with the poor complexion who’s memorable in such ’80s blockbusters as “The Goonies,” “Die Hard” and “License to Kill.” Often the bad guy on the screen, the guy’s got good pipes on stage, as demonstrated throughout this 12-song covers album of Frank Sinatra hits. You’d assume this album to be some half-assed vanity project, but nope! It’s produced by the legendary, 14-time Grammy winner Phil Ramone, who’s worked his studio magic with the likes of Billy Joel, Paul Simon, Burt Bacharach, Madonna and Elton John, not to mention the Chairman of the Board himself.

Plus, Davi doesn’t go for all of Sinatra standards. No “Theme from New York, New York,” no “My Way,” no “Fly Me to the Moon,” “It Was a Very Good Year,” “Strangers in the Night,” “It Had to Be You” and all that. He sings “Witchcraft” and “I’ve Got the World on a String,” and that’s about it for the greatest hits. Admirably, he opts for the lesser-known tunes (“Mam’selle,” anyone?), which forces listeners to hone in on his voice, rather than let their brains recite lyrics they’ve committed to memory. Quite simply, Davi does good; Frank would approve.

That said, it’s not really my thing. But rest assured, my mom is gonna love it. —Rod Lott

by Rod Lott 10.07.2011 2 years ago
at 12:30 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

Ben Folds’ kids listen to Elliott Smith

Don’t count on kiddie tunes from the pop pianist anytime soon.

Talking to Ben Folds two weeks ago was a career highlight for me, as I’ve long been a fan of both his original work and the very funny, imaginative and expletive-laden cover songs he’s recorded. Going into the interview, I wanted to focus on his most recent songwriting and how he felt about the 10th anniversary of “Rockin’ the Suburbs,” but Brian Winkeler at Robot House Creative here in OKC suggested another question that prompted some insight from the world-famous songwriter.


Unfortunately, there wasn’t enough room in my story to include Folds’ answer — slim to none — so a blog post will have to suffice. Here goes:

OKS: I spoke recently with John Linnell of They Might Be Giants, and he remarked on very young fans latching on to their music from their work on the children’s albums. I’m wondering if you’ve noticed younger fans getting into your music from the “Over the Hedge” soundtrack and if working with that potentially whetted your interest in writing songs for kids.

Folds: I don’t think songs have to be written for kids in order to be understood and consumed by kids. So, just a straight-up kids album, I’m not sure about that one. I don’t know how I feel about that. Because you see kids like 4, 5 years old listening to The Beatles. And it can be on the level that’s like, God, “Yellow Submarine.” I don’t know if you have to write it for kids.

To me, They Might Be Giants’ music is very brilliant. But their kid record, meh. I got that ’cause I had kids at the time and then I thought, “God, I don’t want them listening to this crap.” I played them Elliott Smith instead; they liked that. I think They Might Be Giants — Linnell especially — is just absolutely brilliant, so I don’t mean any disrespect. I just think that maybe that’s not the best purpose is to write to kids directly.



Well, there you have it. Folds plays the Civic Center with the OKC Philharmonic tomorrow night at 8 p.m., but you can also catch him tonight as he'll be giving a Mastersclass for ACM@UCO at Exhibit Hall D, Cox Convention Center, 1 Myriad Gardens at 7 p.m. It's free and open to the public.

by Matt Carney 11.02.2011 2 years ago
at 02:55 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

Various Artists — Chronicle: Music from the Motion Picture

For a bunch of unknowns, this one’s really quite super.


Soundtrack

Rod Lott
I’m uncertain about the hit found-footage film, but the soundtrack for “Chronicle” pops with energy from the start, courtesy of Blonde Acid Cult.
 
Tuesday, February 14, 2012

The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo

Think ink, American style.


Thriller

Rod Lott
As not-so-boldly predicted, director David Fincher (The Social Network) delivers a superior remake of Sweden’s global hit The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, an adaptation of Stieg Larsson’s phenomenon of a novel.
 
Monday, March 19, 2012
alloyorchestra-slapstick

C’mon, get slappy

Alloy Orchestra scores some pratfalls at OK Mozart.

As part of this week’s OK Mozart series in Oklahoma City, the Alloy Orchestra returns to perform a live soundtrack to silent films.

At 8 p.m. tonight at Oklahoma City University, the trio presents Masters of Slapstick, a 62-minute program of shorts starring some of the screen’s most legendary silent comedians: Charlie Chaplin, Buster Keaton and Fatty Arbuckle.

Alloy Orchestra is known for crafting unique, original soundtracks to films that had none, using an array of found percussion instruments and state-of-the-art electronics. The Massachusetts-based group was part of last year’s OK Mozart festivities with Fritz Lang’s Metropolis, for which I interviewed Alloy leader Ken Winokur. It’ll give you a good idea of what to expect with tonight’s performance (as will the clip below), despite the difference in films being shown.

Tickets are $10-$20. For more information, visit okmozart.com. —Rod Lott

Hey! Read This:
Alloy Orchestra interview  
Metropolis DVD review 



by Rod Lott 06.11.2012 2 years ago
at 02:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

Kill Speed

Higher. Faster. Harder. Dumber.


Action

Rod Lott
I commend you, Kill Speed, for trying to win audience favor, by killing off a drunk Tom Arnold in your opening scene. We don’t see enough junkie’s trailers being blown up these days in such a spectacular fashion. Yet with the level of enjoyment free-falling from there, you quickly prove yourself the year’s worst action movie.
 
Monday, June 11, 2012

Various artists — The Rock ’n’ Roll Dreams of Duncan Christopher: Songs from the Motion Picture Soundtrack


Soundtrack

Joshua Boydston
Just two years removed from winning Best Okie Feature at deadCENTER Film Festival, the comedy The Rock ’n’ Roll Dreams of Duncan Christopher saw a digital release just this May, with its accompanying soundtrack hitting shelves.
 
Wednesday, June 13, 2012

Don't Go in the Woods

Don’t go near the directorial debut of Vincent D’Onofrio.


Horror

Rod Lott
New to DVD, 2010’s Don't Go in the Woods is not to be confused with 1981’s Don't Go in the Woods. That one was a cheap slasher movie; this one is a cheap slasher movie in which characters wonder what John Fogerty and the Donner party have in common, and then sing songs.
 
Thursday, June 14, 2012

Sound of Noise

Breaking the law never sounded so sweet.


Comedy

Rod Lott
One man's symphony is another's pollution, and to police inspector Amadeus Warnebring (Bengt Nilsson), head of the department's anti-terrorism unit, no music is good music. Although coming from a family of musicians, he's tone-deaf. Notes make his ears bleed, literally.
 
Monday, June 25, 2012
 
Close
Close
Close