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OKG Newsletter


Topic: blogs

Help support a ‘Twisted Sexual Assault’

‘Because we need a full cast of extras for me to feel up, fondle, grope and grab!’

We’re big fans of Kickstarter at OKSee, and the latest such project to cross our desk is certainly the funniest of the bunch.

Oklahoma City producer, Gazette theater review contributor and writer of really, really long reviews of prog-metal albums Eric Webb has partnered with Houston comedy singer Henry Dillard (better known as Without a Face) in hopes of shooting what could well become the best satire of TSA’s aggressive pat-downs in history, right here in Oklahoma City! I now give you, in full, glorious, ’90s slow-grind R&B audio, “The TSA Song”:



Pretty funny, right? Well Webb and Dillard are scrounging up some cash to do this video right, and your support is most certainly appreciated. If Dillard’s pitch video doesn’t convince you to give up a couple of bucks, then you probably shouldn’t be allowed to use the Internet.

Also of note: Henry’s Pedobear T-shirt makes me uncomfortable.
by Matt Carney 01.30.2012 2 years ago
at 01:15 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

They ‘Probably Get That a Lot’

They Might Be Giants invaded Cain’s last night; setlist and photos ensue.

A high school teacher of mine first played They Might Be Giants for me in class, and while I can’t recall which song he picked, I do remember purchasing “A User’s Guide to They Might Be Giants” sometime soon after that. While I didn’t quickly fall in love, I returned to that compilation album in college, mostly because I was fond of John Linnell’s sweet and endearing, if bizarre songwriting.

As such, the band’s punchy rock sound was initially pretty overwhelming for me, since I so often listened to its songs for the humor in the lyrics. It was sort of like catching a left hook with my face, unexpectedly.

Last night, Linnell and John Flansburgh — aided by drummer Marty Beller, bassist Danny Weinkauf and guitarist Dan Miller — gave Cain’s Ballroom a show it’s never seen before and will never see again, replete with plenty of their signature deadpan comedy, crowd-goofing, a Black Sabbath-soundtracked puppet show and, of course, a slew of its very best songs that touched on practically every era of TMBG’s 30-year career.

“Istanbul” got a gnarly, Flanbsburgh-led (very much the showman of the band) guitar solo early on that reminded people, “Oh, yeah, they rock.” I wouldn’t have imagined that ballroom full of nerds jumping up and down so hard that I couldn’t take a steady photograph, but it most definitely happened.

“Birdhouse in Your Soul” was aged and bloated compared to its tight, poppy original arrangement, but I suppose that’s what happens to songs when you play them day in and day out for 20 years. “Marty Beller Mask” was one of the songs off the band’s rarities disc “Album Raises New and Troubling Questions,” and while I would’ve loved to hear its excellent performance of Chumbawamba’s “Tubthumping,” “Marty Beller” is arguably much funnier.

Opener Jonathan Coulton deserves a gold medal in the art of deadpan. The guy’s songs are all informed by boring corporate culture, and he manages to imbue them with a goofy, lovable quality that’s purely endearing. He was the perfect opener.

I would like to see TMBG again, if only to hear “The Statue Got Me High,” which was sadly missing from last night’s festivities. Let’s just hope the group makes the trip all the way to Oklahoma City on its next go-round.

Setlist:
• “Can’t Keep Johnny Down”
• “Celebration”
• “Istanbul (Not Constantinople)”
• “The Mesopotamians”
• unknown song
• “Clap Your Hands”
• “Ana Ng”
• “People vs. Apes”
• “Birdhouse in Your Soul”
• conga line
• “Withered Hope”
• “Old Pine Box”
• “Marty Beller Mask”
• unknown song
• “We Live in a Dump”
• puppet show
• “Cloisonné”
• “Alphabet of Nations”
• “Fingertips”
• “Cowtown”
• “Particle Man”
• “When Will You Die”
• encore break
• “How Can I Sing Like a Girl?”
• “Doctor Worm”
• encore break
• “The Guitar (The Lion Sleeps Tonight)”
• “Dead”
by Matt Carney 02.02.2012 2 years ago
at 01:30 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

‘Game’ on!

Wanna watch a feature documentary on pro video gamers? Here you go!

From 2008, the documentary “Beyond the Game” made some buzz on the festival circuit, and finally hit home video last summer from Cinema Purgatorio. Now, courtesy of the same, you can watch the film for free, in full, right freakin’ now. Thanks, guys! 

The doc follows pro video gamers from around the world, vying for the title of “World of Warcraft” champion. 

Hey, it’s good to have a goal. —Rod Lott


by Rod Lott 02.02.2012 2 years ago
at 02:30 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

VOTD: ‘Needing/Getting’ it done

Miss the premiere of OK Go’s latest, craziest vid during the Super Bowl? Prepare yourself.

While OK Go have never been especially notable for the quirky pop-rock music it records, the painstaking amount of care that goes into their music videos is unassailable. Seriously, if Pavement had invested that much thought and energy into anything, Stephen Malkmus would have recorded 35 platinum records and currently be serving his fifth consecutive term as the governor of California right now.

But, yeah, a condensed version of this video ran during the fourth quarter of last night’s great celebration of American media. It’s so awesome as to demand a few proper watches in full, just to take it all in. The video’s YouTube page insists that the Chevy Sonic was outfitted with pneumatic arms; singer Damian Kulash took stunt driving lessons; the band sang in actual time while driving the car; and that the whole thing required four months to properly put together. Sweet lord.

Take note, musicians: If you’re going to shoot a commercial for a car manufacturer, then shoot the best damn commercial you can:



Also, below’s the halftime show for those who either missed it, or just want to watch Madonna indulge her newly reclaimed pop-idol status again.

Highlights: Cee Lo dresses like a monk, Nicki Minaj and M.I.A. (who flips the bird to the 152 million NBC-viewing folks watching at home) grab their pom-poms for the Material Girl’s new single, “Give Me All Your Luvin’,” and it appears that the Roman Coliseum’s daycare let out early as LMFAO jump in for a dance routine set to the melody from their “Party Rock Anthem” single:


by Matt Carney 02.06.2012 2 years ago
at 08:15 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

MPFree

Lots of locals in this week’s edition of cost-nothing listening, including Two Suns, Dr. Pants and O Fidelis.

O Fidelis — “Mad World”
Normally, married Okie folkers’ songs occupy the opposite side of the emotional spectrum as this 1982 Tears for Fears track (which you might recall that Gary Jules covered for the cult film “Donnie Darko”), but this cover suits them quite nicely, I think.



Dr. Pants — “Calling Chewbacca”

Don’t neglect to read the story behind this one. It’s a doozy.


Two Suns — “Not the End” and “Nostalgic”
“Dream Familiar,” the debut LP from Jake Davidson’s Norman recording project Two Suns, is now up to five tracks available for listening in his ongoing-release model. Check ’em out, as well as our review of the entire record.



Larry Chin — “Days and Nights”
While not a new song, this dreamy, drippy guitar track from Kyle Mayfield (né Larry Chin) is now available for free download, with the message that he’s working on a new EP. Gives a new meaning to the phrase “chin music.” Anyway, this one gives a local lease on the excellent major indie band Real Estate.


Jack White — “Love Interruption”
Let’s just say I liked Jack White better when he sported red and white and distorted blues guitar. This clarinet-blue-shaving-thing just isn’t working out for me.


Dr. Dog — “Be the Void”
OKSee’s groovier, hippie tendencies got really excited last week when we found out Delo Creative shot the video for the first single on this record. With the whole album now available to hear, we’re happier than a dog off his leash.

Shearwater — “Animal Joy”
Looking for a high-concept indie record about nature? Look no further.

Air— “Le Voyage Dans La”
This first track “Astronomic Club” goes from sounding like My Morning Jacket’s weird single “Holding On to Black Metal” into some kind of oddball spaghetti Western twang. Welcome back, Air.

Fucked Up — “Zodiac”
A couple of rare tracks from Canadian hardcore sextet about the Chinese zodiac. Nifty.

by Matt Carney 02.06.2012 2 years ago
at 03:00 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

R&R Q&A with the Ford brothers

Making the zombie film ‘The Dead’ almost turned the two men into zombies themselves.

For their latest project, UK filmmaking brothers Howard J. and Jonathan Ford shared scripting and directorial duties, which is a good thing, considering the experience nearly killed them (and others). The end result is not-so-ironically titled “The Dead,”  a zombie epic set in South Africa that’s been called one of the genre’s best in recent years. It hits home video on Valentine’s Day, so share it with the one you love. Until then, here’s our interview with both sibs about making the horror film. 

R&R: With so many zombie projects these days, why another one?

Howard Ford: For us, it's our first. We felt it would be different. We hadn't seen a living dead movie in Africa before, and in a way, we were slightly taking the living dead legend back to its roots in Haiti, French-speaking West Africa as well, where we shot the movie. That was very, very difficult to do, but we wanted a journey movie, and it felt different for that reason. It was a film that could hopefully work for people who just wanted to be entertained by the zombie situations and also to find deeper meaning as well.

Jonathan Ford: I felt like this genre of movie had passed without this particular type of movie having being made. An era had passed without all the boxes checked.

Howard Ford: And going back to the classics, as well. We first saw [George A.] Romero's “Dawn of the Dead” when I was 11 and that blew us away. It took horror into the light. And we've seen a few films since then that have been a little more disappointing. There's a formula now: People end up cooped up in a building and zombies try to get in. We said, “No, let's just take people on a journey so they're never in the same location for a few minutes.” That was something we personally wanted to see.

R&R: Shooting in regions that have been described as "life-threatening," what were you thinking?

Howard Ford: Funny, "What were we thinking?" is the opening line of my book I just finished this morning, I kid you not. It comes out in March, but that’s another story. What the hell were we thinking? A movie by British filmmakers in French-speaking West Africa ...

Jonathan Ford: ... with a Canadian vegan lead!

Howard Ford: The whole thing is crazy on paper and it was crazy. I was mugged by knife point on day one in the city and they took everything: my cards, my cash, my driver's license. The police tried to put me in jail for driving without the license taken from me in the mugging. The lead actor, Rob Freeman, nearly died of malaria.

Jonathan Ford: I got malaria, too. Horrific food poisoning. Every meal was like Russian roulette, and that's when you could find a meal. What the hell were we thinking?

Howard Ford: We were often digging for a toilet. There's no facilities there. You dig a whole in the ground and good luck to you. We kind of wanted to have this organic feeling and it became a life-threatening journey.

R&R: How long of a shoot was it?

Howard Ford:
Well, it was supposed to be six weeks, but it took us five weeks to get our equipment out of the port.

Jonathan Ford: We were out there for about three months.

Howard Ford: When we did get going after five weeks of waiting on our equipment and paying God knows what every day at the ports, then Rob collapsed with cerebral malaria, convulsing, spent the night on a table covered in his own shit because there was no hospital bed.

Jonathan Ford: Then the doctor said, "He may not pull through. He's going to die in the next two or three days." And then he was on a trip for two weeks, so that's seven weeks down, and we haven't even done anything yet!

Howard Ford: And there's police pointing guns us for money all the time. It was just a living hell.

R&R: The film has been pretty well-received, yet it hasn't been given a large theatrical release in North America? I imagine that has to be frustrating after all that you went through --

Jonathan Ford: Yes!

Howard Ford: We're proud of what we've done, given the circumstances under which we did it, but it got a theatrical release, which is what we wanted, in 20 cities across the U.S.

Jonathan Ford: Unless you've got a big name in your movie, you ain't gonna get a large theatrical release. We accept that's the way the business works. It's not about how good or bad your movie is. It's down to the name thing, and we didn't have a name.

Howard Ford: We didn't have Paris Hilton in it, which is probably a shame …

Jonathan Ford: Steven Seagal.

Howard Ford: We'd love to see it more on the big screen. Audience reactions are really, really good.

Jonathan Ford: Certainly after the heart and soul and pain, and blood and sweat and tears — a lot of blood, sweat and tears — yeah, obviously, you want it to get the biggest exposure you can.

Howard Ford: We didn't shoot digital, so after lugging a 35mm camera across the Sahara Desert under such difficult circumstances — yes, it would've been nice to get it out there more. But hey, if people support the film on DVD and Blu-ray, and we're thoroughly appreciative of everyone who supports the movie by buying it …

Jonathan Ford: Hopefully it finds its audience there.

Howard Ford: ... we'll come back and do it all again.

R&R: You really would do a sequel? Do you have one in mind?

Howard Ford: We talked about the sequel even before the first one. But we had such a horrific experience making the film, which has made us very concerned about it, but yes. What it comes down to is, is there a demand for it? Do enough people buy the DVD and Blu-ray?

Jonathan Ford: It broke my heart, [but] some of my favorite sequences never made it into the film. We could easily pack another movie and hopefully make an ever better one next time.

Howard Ford: The U.S. release [of the Blu-ray and DVD] really has a bearing on all that.

Jonathan Ford: It's kind of hinging on that. It's all or nothing now! —Rod Lott

Read our review of "The Dead."





by Rod Lott 02.02.2012 2 years ago
at 08:45 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

Z-TV

Darla Z sings from Vegas to your couch.

Local songstress of the standards, Darla Zudhi, has announced the Oklahoma premiere of her televised concert from Sin City. “Darla Z Live from Las Vegas” will air at 7 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 18, on KSBI-TV 52 (Cox 7, HD 707).

Although the concert was shot Sept. 22, 2011, it aired nationally on cable and satellite networks in January.

Fans will be able to purchase a DVD of the show, as well as a CD soundtrack album. According to the disc’s cover, her lineup features two original tracks among a total of 14, including such classic numbers as “Fly Me to the Moon,” “That’s Life,” “The Shadow of Your Smile” and “This Magic Moment.”

For more information, visit ksbitv.com and darlazontv.com, and get nearly an eight-minute preview below. —Rod Lott



by Rod Lott 02.07.2012 2 years ago
at 03:30 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

VOTD: Drink the Kool-Aid

We mean indie-pop band Cults’ cut for ‘You Know What I Mean.’

Cults — in case you forgot — were the delightful big-label-masquerading-as-indie-darlings pop surprise of 2011. Regardless of who distributed their excellent debut album, it’s, well, excellent.


This video of guitarist Brian Oblivion taking a massive-scaled circus plunge off a platform and into the heart of cutie-pie singer Madeline Follin matches the tender tone of the ’60s girl-group song, at least until her daddy gets mad and another circus stunt goes wrong.


by Matt Carney 02.10.2012 2 years ago
at 08:30 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

That holiday with the hearts

Happy Valentine’s weekend, everybody!

Okay, I know that V-Day is generally a consumeristic ploy to sell a massive amount of heart-shaped candy and greeting cards, not to mention flowers ... but the point behind it all, I think, is to stop and remember the things you love, whether that's a person, a group of people, a dog, a family or just yourself.

The cool thing about this city is that it comes equipped with fun having for all. So whether you're celebrating this weekend, Tuesday or thereafter, here are some things to keep you busy.

First off, get your OKCityCard. It's one of the primary fundraisers for Allied Arts, and February is Allied Arts Month, so it only makes sense. They are $50, which is donated in entirety to Allied Arts.

It's a pretty sweet deal and partners with more than 200 locations around the metro. If you're running low on ideas (or cash), then just peruse the list of discounts at alliedartsokc.com/okcitycard.

Are you a little bookish? Head to Full Circle Bookstore, 1900 Northwest Expressway at 50 Penn Place, on Tuesday for live music, wine sales, 10 percent off any book with the word “love” in the title and a roaring fireplace.

Cozy in a couple and ready to grow your family? This is your chance to do so. The Central OK Humane Adoption Center at 7500 N. Western is offering a lovable deal: All dogs and cats are free to adopt Saturday and Sunday.

If you feel like getting out on the town tonight, hit up the second annual LOVE on the Plaza. You can expect a kiss cam, lots of local art and some live music. You can even participate in a Valentine's creation contest or take part in a power performance piece hosted by Cole Dewey Design called “The Gay Agenda,” which features two men performing daily routines that a heterosexual couple would perform.

No matter what you decide, show some local love in honor of St. Valentine.
by Jenn Scott 02.10.2012 2 years ago
at 04:15 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

VOTD: Grammy edition

With congratulations to Okie Grammy winner (kinda) Sugar Free Allstars!

Despite my earlier predilections, Maroon 5’s performance of The Beach Boys’ classic “Surfer Girl” was actually kind of awesome. I think this was mostly due to Adam Levine’s severe discipline in keeping his shirt on. I won’t defend Foster the People’s take on “Wouldn’t It Be Nice” or terrible band name, however. Singer Mark Foster looked about as petrified as Brian Wilson’s craggy old face.

And speaking of Brian Wilson, I’m just kind of amazed that his voice can still get that high.



Glad to see Adele’s voice survived that vocal cord surgery. I think she’s still just a couple servings’ worth of charisma shy of being a top-tier pop star, though. “Rolling in the Deep” has always struck me as a little bland, even more so after Jennifer Hudson came out and yanked tears out of everybody’s faces later in the evening.



I now give you the absolute train wreck of the evening, provided by Miss Nicki Minaj and a cavalcade of creepily sexualized Catholic imagery:



What awesome justice did Okie Blake Shelton do to the great Glen Campbell? The Band Perry was all right doing “Gentle on My Mind,” but Shelton’s take on “Southern Nights” shined:



Sir Paul McCartney got some guitar-lickin’ help from Dave Grohl, Bruce Springsteen and Joe Walsh, marking the single greatest living advertisement for Viagra and devices used to feather aging gentlemen’s hair in live television history:



Unfortunately, no Oklahoman walked out of the Staples Center with a clear-cut win last night, but Sugar Free Allstars can claim one-20th of an award for their contribution to Best Children’s Album winner, “All About Bullies ... Big and Small!” Said the band in an email, “ AAAAAAHHHHHHHH THE ALBUM WON THE GRAMMY FOR BEST CHILDREN'S ALBUM!!! WE OFFICIALLY HAVE A SONG ON A GRAMMY AWARD WINNING ALBUM AAAAHHHH!!!”

OKSee-approved acts fared pretty decently though as Adele’s lauded album, “21,” cleaned house, earning her six awards. Bon Iver’s eponymous second record earned him the Best New Artist award and Best Alternative Album (you might recall him winning our coveted Album of 2011 distinction as well).

For more info, a partial list of the winners included:

• Album of the Year: “21,” Adele

• Record of the Year: “Rolling in the Deep,” Adele

• Song of the Year: “Rolling in the Deep,” Adele Adkins and Paul Epworth

• New Artist: Bon Iver

• Pop Vocal Album: “21,” Adele

• Pop Performance by a Duo or Group: “Body and Soul,” Tony Bennett and Amy Winehouse

• Pop Solo Performance: “Someone Like You,” Adele

• Rock Song: “Walk,” Foo Fighters

• Rock Album: “Wasting Light,” Foo Fighters

• Rock Performance: “Walk,” Foo Fighters

• R&B Song: “Fool For You,” Cee Lo Green, Melanie Hallim and Jack Splash

• R&B Album: “F.A.M.E.,” Chris Brown

• Rap Performance: “Otis,” Jay-Z and Kanye West

• Rap Song: “All of the Lights,” Kanye West

• Rap Album: “My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy,” Kanye West

• Country Vocal Solo Performance: “Mean,” Taylor Swift

• Country Performance by a Duo or Group: “Barton Hollow,” The Civil Wars

• Country Album: “Own the Night,” Lady Antebellum

• Latin Pop, Rock or Urban Album: “Drama y Luz,” Mana

• Jazz Vocal Album: “The Mosaic Project,” Terri Lyne Carrington and various artists

• Opera Recording: “Adams: Doctor Atomic,” Alan Gilbert, conductor

• Traditional Gospel Album: “Hello Fear,” Kirk Franklin

• Dance Recording: “Scary Monsters and Nice Sprites,” Skrillex

• Dance/Electronica Album: “Scary Monsters and Nice Sprites,” Skrillex

• Alternative Music Album: “Bon Iver,” Bon Iver

• Spoken Word Album: “If You Ask Me (and of Course You Won’t),” Betty White

And, regarding Lady Gaga’s rather hilarious and severe snubbing, I will say only this:

by Matt Carney 02.13.2012 2 years ago
at 08:45 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 
 
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