Wednesday 23 Apr
 
 
 photo 85cca911-3826-446b-828b-785107dd2ef3_zpse09f07ac.jpg

 

OKG Newsletter


Topic: mad men

Mod-ified

Mid-century modern architecture enthusiasts can’t get enough of its sleek design and creativity around the state.


Features

Malena Lott
"Despite what many Americans might perceive as an oxymoron, there actually is a Modern Oklahoma,” wrote Rex and Jackie Brown at oklahomamodern.us, where they bring awareness to midcentury architectural marvels around the Sooner State by documenting their finds.
 
Wednesday, August 3, 2011

The Hour

Tick-tock and you don't stop. Or do you?


Television series

Rod Lott
All signs pointed to me liking "The Hour":
 
Monday, October 3, 2011

Page One: Inside The New York Times

All the news that’s fit to shoot about all the news that’s fit to print.


Documentary

Rod Lott
Startling admission: As a career-long journalist in one form or another, it is difficult for me to be truly objective about the documentary “Page One: Inside The New York Times.”
 
Monday, October 10, 2011

Eagleheart: Season One

Pretty arresting humor there, Chris Elliott.


Television series

Rod Lott
Consider the lines "I'm going to T.J. Maxx for a while. I'll catch up with you guys later" and "I always thought it was a myth, like fibromyalgia." Interest piqued? If yes, Eagleheart awaits!
 
Wednesday, April 4, 2012
girls-hbo

Up yours, Carrie Bradshaw

HBO's 'Girls' gets going great.

I’m guessing not many saw 2010’s Tiny Furniture, an imperfect but smart and charming comedy that burst Lena Dunham, its star/writer/director, onto the indie-feature scene. On its strength and reception, Dunham scored a series deal at HBO with none other than Judd Apatow (Bridesmaids) producing.

The result, Girls, debuts at 9:30 p.m. Sunday on HBO. It may deal with the lives of four unmarried, 20-something women in New York City, but this is no Sex and the City, and thank the stars above for that. One of its characters, the shy virgin played by Zosia Mamet (daughter of David, and a recurring player on Mad Men), references that once-zeitgeist hit of female wish-fulfillment fantasy with a fawning voice and goo-goo eyes, but the knock at it is unmistakable, and appreciated.

Dunham, writing wise beyond her years and directing just fine, is front and center as Hannah, who, in the pilot, learns her parents (including Bosom Buddies’ Peter Scolari as her noncombative dad) are cutting the cord of financial support. She’s hopeful her publishing internship will turn into a “real” job, but it doesn’t, and her love life fares no more success. Oh, she’s getting laid on a constant basis — it’s just with the most repulsive, uncaring beast a single gal should never get near.

From the first three half-hour episodes I previewed, it’s clear that the politically incorrect comedy already stands on firm footing, confident in its resolute archness. Example: Episode two, titled “Vagina Panic,” finds a plot in throwing a quasi-party for an abortion to be had by Jessa (Tiny Furniture vet Jemima Kirke, the show’s weakest link), so indeed, Girls isn’t for everyone. A skewed sense of humor is a must.

Dunham is in danger of having the entire show stole from under her by Hannah’s bitchy roommate, Marnie (Allison Williams, daughter of NBC News anchor Brian Williams), but hey, isn’t that just like real life? Here’s hoping the remainder of its freshman season are as diabolically winning. —Rod Lott

Hey! Read This:
Bridesmaids movie review
Mad Men: Season Four Blu-ray review
Tiny Furniture movie review


by Rod Lott 04.12.2012 2 years ago
at 01:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

Mad, mad, mad men


CFN

Gazette staff
The late comedian Bill Hicks once called people in advertising “Satan’s little helpers.” While that catchy phrase isn’t explicitly noted in a Feb. 13 Washington Post story about Oklahoma City-based Ackerman McQueen, it does sort of loom over the article’s examination of how the high-profile firm has shaped some bizarre ad campaigns for the National Rifle Association.
 
Tuesday, February 19, 2013
 
Close
Close
Close