Tag Archives: listen

Album review: Horse Thief – Fear in Bliss

Listening to Horse Thief’s previous release — the haphazardly melodramatic Grow Deep, Grow Wild — felt like a chore. Whatever potential the Oklahoma City folk-pop act demonstrated on the EP was obscured behind a formulaic, contrived and ultimately hollow cloud. But it at least offered a glimmer of promise for a band consisting of, frankly,

Horse Thief — Little Dust

In advance of their upcoming album, Fear in Bliss, Oklahoma City folk-rockers Horse Thief debuted a new single this week on popular music blog Stereogum.  The song, “Little Dust,” is a breezier affair than “Devil,” the album’s first single. It features a mid-tempo rhythm section and twangy guitar swells layered beneath singer Cameron Neal’s nasally croon, and

Colourmusic — May You Marry Rich

The Stillwater-based psychedelic act closed the curtain on last month’s Buffalo Lounge events at South by Southwest with a dazzlingly deafening set of material new and old, raising the already-high bar for one of Oklahoma’s most established and prodigious acts. Thankfully, May You Marry Rich — the band’s third studio album — by and large

Flaming trips

The release is a companion album to The Dark Side of the Moon, and it’s designed to be played simultaneously, preferably with the original 1973 vinyl. It also syncs with the 1939 film The Wizard of Oz, too, so it stands to reason you can listen to the Lips while listening to Pink Floyd while

Skating Polly — Fuzz Steilacoom

The former is a startlingly authoritative, snarling take of Kelli Mayo and Peyton Bighorse’s brand of punk-anchored “ugly pop,” a fully realized vision of doom and gloom showing just how lethal Skating Polly can be. The latter is a stripped-down, heart-tugging piano ballad on par with anything Regina Spektor has ever done, toying with lush

Moving music

It may not be a story as old as time, but the trope of Okies wandering to California in search of opportunity goes back at least to the Dust Bowl. And while the paucity of prospects may not have the same harrowing look it did in the 1920s, people still move from windy plains to

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